Department of Criminal Justice < Catalog (2022)

Courses

CJ100. Introduction to the Criminal Justice System. 3 Hours.

Introduction to criminal justice as a system consisting of interactions among three main components: police, courts, and corrections and the processes involving those components.

CJ101. Crime and Criminality. 3 Hours.

Examination of the causes and consequences in society of crime/delinquency, including theoretical explanations, sources of data on crime/delinquency, and efforts at controlling the behavior.

CJ110. Introduction to Forensic Science. 3 Hours.

Overview of the major components of forensic science including death investigation, toxicology, osteology, questioned documents, law, and criminalistics.

CJ115. Comparative Criminal Justice Systems. 3 Hours.

Analysis of police, judicial, and correctional components found in the world's four major legal systems: Common Law, Islamic, Napoleonic and Socialist.

CJ125. Introduction to Forensic Psychology. 3 Hours.

Overview of issues involving the intersection of law and psychology. Focus on role of clinical asessment of competency, scientific jury selection, expert witnesses in court, punishment and sentencing, and related issues.

CJ160. Introduction to Private Security. 3 Hours.

Survey of the field of private security, including organizational, administrative, operational, and liability issues common to it.

CJ170. Introduction to Crime Scene Analysis. 3 Hours.

Overview of crime scene investigation (CSI), including history of crime scene investigation; processing techniques and methods used to document and preserve evidence found at crime scenes.

CJ207. Crime and Everyday Life. 3 Hours.

Crime affects all of us—in large and small ways, and through circumstances and situations that range from exceptional to ordinary. Criminology, at its core, is a social science—it seeks to understand people, and how they interact within (and are affected by) the environments they create. Therefore, this course aims to provide you with a socio-criminological approach to the field of criminology. This means thinking about and understanding crime and deviance in ways that enable us to make observations and offer insights that extend far beyond “common sense,” personal experience, or explanations that rely only on individual characteristics. This course is designed to introduce you to “the sociological imagination” and encourage you to develop this critical capacity to recognize and understand the social causes of criminal behavior, highlighting, in particular, the roles of race/ethnicity, social class, and gender. The lectures, readings, and assignments will focus on understanding basic social processes and their application to criminology, equipping students with the ability to identify and understand the social systems and structures that allow crime to emerge, persist, and often remain invisible.

CJ210. Introduction to Digital Forensics. 3 Hours.

This course provides a general introduction to the concepts, theories, principles, and practice of digital forensics. Topics include types of digital forensics, DOS/LINUX commands and DF, forensic acquisition and validation, forensic methodologies, file systems and file examination, expert testimony, legal issues, and challenges for the field. This course prepares students for advanced courses in program and in digital forensics.

CJ220. Police in America: An Overview. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the history and evolution of modern law enforcement in the United States, including the role and functions of police in the community.
Prerequisites: CJ100 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently) or JS 100 [Min Grade: C]

CJ230. The Judicial Process in America: An Overview. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the structure and function of American courts, including judicial selection and behavior, the prosecution function, jury system, and the role of lawyers.
Prerequisites: CJ100 [Min Grade: C] or JS 100 [Min Grade: C]

CJ240. Corrections in America: An Overview. 3 Hours.

Introduction to history and evolution of probation, prisons, parole, and community-based programs for adult and juvenile offenders.
Prerequisites: CJ100 [Min Grade: C] or JS 100 [Min Grade: C]

CJ250. Criminalistics: An Overview. 3 Hours.

Introduction to indentification and application of major types of physical trace evidence in criminal cases involving analysis and comparision. Laboratory component included; Laboratory fee is charged.
Prerequisites: JS 110 [Min Grade: C] or CJ110 [Min Grade: C]

CJ255. Journey to Attorney. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to American law as well how law is studied. Specifically, the course examines topics law students typically encounter in their first year of law school -- including criminal law, tort law, contract law, property law, civil procedure, and legal writing – provides an overview of the law school application process, and covers some of the skills necessary for success in law school.

CJ300. Research Methods in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

Introduction to ideas, techniques, and problems associated with social research with an emphasis on criminal justice/criminology applications. Writing assignments emphasize ability to make a logical argument and respond to counter claims; incorporating outside sources into written materials; and use conventions appropriate for the discipline. Writing is a significant component of this course.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ100 [Min Grade: C]) and (JS 101 [Min Grade: C] or CJ101 [Min Grade: C])

CJ302. Introduction to Statistics. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic statistical theory and analysis. Course emphasizes computation, units of measurement, and evaluation of quantitative assertions; interpretation of quantitative data; use of quantitative data for problem-solving; and communication of information using numbers/words appropriate for the audience. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course.

CJ320. Police Organization and Administration. 3 Hours.

Analysis of organizational and administrative structure and function of police departments in the U.S.
Prerequisites: JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ100 [Min Grade: C]

CJ321. Police-Community Relations. 3 Hours.

Overview and analysis of historical and contemporary relationship between police agencies and the public; legal issues; analysis of crime prevention programs, community participation, and police discretion.
Prerequisites: JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ100 [Min Grade: C]

CJ330. Criminal Law. 3 Hours.

Analysis of the development of criminal law, including legal elements of a crime, defenses in criminal cases, appellate case analysis, and legal terminology.

CJ331. Criminal Procedure. 3 Hours.

Introduction to legal rules relating to the criminal process from investigation through punishment.

CJ332. Criminal Evidence. 3 Hours.

Examination of the system of rules and standards, both state and federal, by which admission of proof at criminal trial is regulated.

CJ333. Trial Advocacy. 3 Hours.

Overview of preparations for civil and criminal litigation including courtroom procedure, evidence, and the art of advocacy.

CJ334. Justice Advocacy. 3 Hours.

Analyze theoretical foundations of advocacy in justice, in the court process, and in social, political, and legal settings. Presents philosophy and techniques of advocacy for an equitable and collaborative system of justice.

CJ336. Criminal Investigation: Techniques and Analysis. 3 Hours.

Examination of both technical and analytical aspects of the criminal investigative process.

CJ341. Correctional Institutions. 3 Hours.

Introduction to prisons, jails, and juvenile institutions in the U.S.; evolution of penology and correctional change strategies; inmate social system; prison stress, violence, and reform.
Prerequisites: JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ100 [Min Grade: C]

CJ342. Probation and Parole. 3 Hours.

Analysis of history, structure, and function of probation and parole systems in the United States; pre-sentence investigations; offender selection and classification; offender supervision; and agency administration.
Prerequisites: JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ100 [Min Grade: C]

CJ343. Community-Based Corrections. 3 Hours.

Examination of contemporary redefinition of correctional functions emphasizing development and use of community resources; diversion of offenders from criminal justice system; nontraditional correctional programs.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ100 [Min Grade: C])

CJ350. Advanced Criminalistics. 3 Hours.

Examination of advanced criminalistics, including trace evidence, fingerprints, documents, drugs and other areas. Comparison of methods is emphasized.
Prerequisites: JS 110 [Min Grade: C] or CJ110 [Min Grade: C]

CJ352. Forensic Science Lab. 3 Hours.

Examination of forensic science, including collection, serology, DNA extraction, DNA amplification, and DNA analysis.
Prerequisites: JS 110 [Min Grade: C] or CJ110 [Min Grade: C]

CJ360. Criminology. 3 Hours.

Identification and assessment of early and modern theories concerning the causes of crime in society.
Prerequisites: JS 101 [Min Grade: C] or CJ101 [Min Grade: C]

CJ362. Victimology. 3 Hours.

Examination of the criminal-victim relationship and societal reaction to victims including victim services, restitution, and compensation.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ100 [Min Grade: C]) and (JS 101 [Min Grade: C] or CJ101 [Min Grade: C])

CJ380. Media, Crime & Justice. 3 Hours.

Examination of issues in crime and justice as depicted in popular media, including motion pictures, television, video, and other media.

CJ390. The Death Penalty in America. 3 Hours.

Overview of capital punishment in America including its history and justification, major Supreme Court rulings, current issues, and future directions.

CJ400. Drugs and Society. 3 Hours.

This course teaches students the pharmacological effects of and different categories of drugs. Different theories of drug use are discussed as well as the historical development of drug laws. Various harms associated with drug use are discussed as well as the consequences of drug prohibition. Lastly, students are expected to understand the different methods of drug research.

CJ402. Computer Forensics. 3 Hours.

Use of analytical and investigative techniques in criminal or civil litigation to identify, collect, examine and preserve evidence/information magnetically stored or encoded.
Prerequisites: CJ210 [Min Grade: C]

CJ403. Restorative Justice. 3 Hours.

Introduction to, and analysis of, movement in criminal justice to institutionalize peaceful approaches to harm, problem-solving and violations of legal and human rights. Includes discussion of specific programs, critical evaluation of these programs, and analysis of future directions of the movement.

CJ404. Serial Killers. 3 Hours.

Examination of the psychology and sociology of serial killers, including case studies, agency responses and related issues.

CJ407. Special Topics in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

In-depth analysis of substantive topic in criminal justice or criminology including contemporary issues, ethics, historical review, or related topics. Varies by semester and by Instructor. May be repeated twice for credit.

CJ408. Juvenile Delinquency. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the nature, scope, and causes of illegal behavior by juveniles, and societal repsonses to that behavior.

CJ410. Criminal Justice Ethics. 3 Hours.

Analysis of systems of ethics and their applicability to problems in the administration of the justice system including those facing police officials, lawyers, judges, and correctional professionals. Writing and Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.
Prerequisites: JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ100 [Min Grade: C]

CJ411. Juvenile Justice System. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the evolution and operation of specialized agencies and procedures to address juvenile law-breaking, including emerging problems and solutions.

CJ412. Juvenile Law. 3 Hours.

Review and analysis of emerging statutory and case law in American juvenile justice.

CJ419. Investigating Online Crimes. 3 Hours.

Introduction to cyber investigative techniques involving focused analysis of email and websites; examination of legal process and preparing evidence in cyber crime cases; rules concerning introduction of digital evidence.
Prerequisites: CJ402 [Min Grade: C] or JS 402 [Min Grade: C]

CJ424. Serial Killers in Cross-National Settings. 3 Hours.

Examines serial homicide in cross-national settings including offender disorders; crime scene analysis; significance of victims; and offender classification process.

CJ436. The Intelligence Community. 3 Hours.

Weekly seminars by intelligence community experts covering relevant topics including state fusion centers; proliferation of intelligence units within first responder agencies; growing role of the private sector; and local prosecution for intelligence agency abuse.

CJ437. Digital Media Forensics. 3 Hours.

Digital media forensics addresses all stored digital evidence types faced by cyber security professionals and computer forensics examiners. Students will learn to analyze character encoding, file formats, and digital media, including hard drives, smartphones and other portable devices, and cloud-hosted evidence, as well as disk acquisition, duplication and evidence preservation techniques and how to apply these techniques in typical criminal investigation scenarios.
Prerequisites: JS 402 [Min Grade: C] or CJ402 [Min Grade: C]

CJ437L. Digital Media Forensics Lab. 0 Hours.

Laboratory to accompany CJ437.

CJ438. Investigations of Malicious Attacks. 3 Hours.

This course will address the means to investigate cyber attacks in a corporate or industrial setting. Tools for investigating and responding to malicious emails, phishing, ransomware, and attacks on websites, database systems, Windows, and Linux systems will be addressed from the varying perspectives of system administrators, network defenders, security researchers, and cyber law enforcement.

CJ440. White Collar and Corporate Crime. 3 Hours.

Introduction to, and analysis of, illegal/deviant behavior occurring in complex organizational settings, including theoretical explanations; patterns and case studies; and control strategies.

CJ442. Race, Crime, Gender and Social Policy. 3 Hours.

Examination of how subordinate status of minority groups (African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans and Women) affects interaction with the justice system as offenders, victims, and professionals.

CJ443. Women and the Criminal Justice System. 3 Hours.

Examination of women's experiences as offenders, victims, and professionals in the criminal and civil justice systems.
Prerequisites: (CJ100 [Min Grade: C] or JS 100 [Min Grade: C]) and (CJ101 [Min Grade: C] or JS 101 [Min Grade: C])

CJ445. Juvenile Corrections. 3 Hours.

Examination of historical and contemporary efforts to reduce juvenile delinquency through institutional and community-based programs; innovative programs; evaluation of program effectiveness.
Prerequisites: (CJ100 [Min Grade: C] or JS 100 [Min Grade: C]) and (CJ101 [Min Grade: C] or JS 101 [Min Grade: C])

CJ454. Financial Crimes and Investigations. 3 Hours.

Survey of the field of financial crime and its investigation, including review of various financial crimes (fraud, money laundering, cybercrime, etc.), investigative techniques, resources specific to the investigation of these crimes, and the role of financial institutions in combating these crimes.

CJ460. Violence: An American Tradition. 3 Hours.

Examines violence as an American tradition, including historical acts of violence as catalysts for social change, destructive or negative violence, and policies and prevention strategies.

CJ463. Urban Structures. 3 Hours.

One of the oldest explanations of criminal behavior is that crime is concentrated in particular areas of the city. This class examines the structure of cities, how they grow, and particularly how they decline. It addresses how this decline can produce high levels of crime. It also addresses how cities can be revitalized, and how the justice system can work to reduce crime in these areas.

CJ464. Crime and Place. 3 Hours.

One of the oldest explanations of criminal behavior is that crime is concentrated in particular areas of the city. But why is that? Is it something about the people, the place, or both? This class will look at the structure of cities, how they grow, and particularly how they decline. We will talk about how this decline can produce high levels of crime. We will also talk about how cities can be revitalized, and how the justice system can work to reduce crime in these areas.
Prerequisites: CJ463 [Min Grade: D]

CJ466. Spatial Analysis. 3 Hours.

This skills-based class will introduce students to the application of geographic information systems (GIS) to crime-related topics and issues.

CJ481. Honors Research. 3 Hours.

Undergraduate research project developed and completed under direction of faculty mentor.

CJ482. Honors Research and Colloquium. 3 Hours.

Completion of undergraduate Honors Project under the guidance of a faculty mentor with presentation of project at department colloquium.

CJ483. Patterns in Crime. 3 Hours.

Examination of the major correlates of crime and criminality; critical examination of major sources of information from which data on crime correlates are gathered.
Prerequisites: (CJ100 [Min Grade: C] or JS 100 [Min Grade: C]) and (CJ101 [Min Grade: C] or JS 101 [Min Grade: C])

CJ490. Independent Research in Criminal Justice. 1-3 Hour.

Independent readings, research or project approved and directed by a criminal justice faculty member who supervises proposed plan of study. Permission of Department Chair.

CJ492. Study Abroad in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

This course affords students the opportunity engage in academic study outside of the U.S. to examine substantive topics in crime and justice. Students spend time (to be determined by the specific program) at a destination point, where they engage with students and faculty members in classroom and research settings at partner post-secondary institutions, experience immersion in foreign culture, and engage in comparative analysis of policies and programs relating to crime and justice.

CJ493. Internship and Capstone for Digital Forensics Practitioners. 3 Hours.

Supervised capstone experience for students working full-time in a government agency or company in a position utilizing skills in digital forensics or cyber security. Course strongly emphasizes demonstration of student’s ability to communicate in writing; understanding and practicing ethical decision making and civic responsibility; and quantitative analyses including construction and interpretation of tables and ability to adequately communicate quantitative information. Prerequisite: Permission of Internship Coordinator. No more than 3 hours of credit toward the degree may be earned.

CJ494. Digital Forensics Capstone. 1 Hour.

The digital forensics capstone is designed to prepare students with the skills needed to secure employment in the field of digital forensics, cyber security, and forensic investigation. Students will engage in resume writing, interview skills and career launch learning modules. The course strongly emphasizes demonstration of ability to communicate in writing, understanding ethical decision making, and civic responsibility. Prerequisite: Permission of the Capstone Instructor and verification from academic advisor that student is in the last 30 hours of coursework.

CJ495. Digital Forensics Internship and Capstone. 3,6 Hours.

Supervised capstone experience in government agency or private company utilizing skills learned in cyber security and forensic investigation. Course strongly emphasizes demonstration of ability to communicate in writing; understanding and practicing ethical decision making and civic responsibility; and quantitative analyses including construction and interpretation of tables and ability to adequately communicate quantitative information. Prerequisite: Permission of the Internship Coordinator. May be repeated for maximum of 12 hours of which not more than 6 hours may be counted toward fulfilling major or minor requirements.

CJ497. Internship and Capstone in Criminal Justice for Practitioners. 3 Hours.

Supervised capstone experience for students already working in a local, state, or federal criminal justice or ancillary agency. Course strongly emphasizes demonstration of student’s ability to communicate in written form to appropriate audiences, including competence in grammar and mechanics; understanding and practicing ethical decision making and civic responsibility; and quantitative analyses including construction and interpretation of tables and ability to adequately communicate quantitative information. No more than 3 hours of credit toward degree may be earned. Prerequisite: Permission of Internship Coordinator.

CJ499. Internship and Capstone in Criminal Justice. 3-6 Hours.

Supervised capstone experience in local, state, or federal criminal justice or ancillary agency. Course strongly emphasizes demonstration of ability to communicate in written form to an appropriate audience, including competence in grammar and mechanics; understanding and practicing ethical decision making and civic responsibility; and quantitative analyses including construction and interpretation of tables and ability to adequately communicate quantitative information. Prerequisite: Permission of the Internship Coordinator. May be repeated for maximum of 12 hours of which not more than 6 hours may be counted toward fulfilling major or minor requirements. Ethics and Civil Responsibility and Writing are significant components of this course.

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